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Volcanoes  

Oak School 4th Grade Resources
Last Updated: Jan 29, 2012 URL: http://libguides.d181.org/volcanoes Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts
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General Information

  • Explore a Virtual Volcano
  • Encyclopedia Britannica Article
    Mentions Krakatoa, Mt. Pelee, Mt. Tambora, Paracutin, Mt. Pinatubo, and Mt. St. Helens
  • Composite Volcanoes
  • Shake, Rattle and Roll
  • What is a Volcano?
    Weather Wiz Kids Volcano Information Page
  • Scholastic Weather: Volcanoes
    Contains basics, more in-depth information, experiments, witness account, words to know, experts say, be ready! and explore the ring of fire
  • Blow Your Top
    This is a guided tour of a volcanic eruption.
  • Volcanoes
    This video segment from IdahoPTV's D4K explains where and how volcanoes form and the role magma plays in their formation. Descriptions and examples of the 3 kinds of volcanoes are gives. Tectonic plates and hot spots are also discussed.
  • NOVA: Anatomy of a Volcano Interactive
    from Teachers Domain
  • The World of Volcanoes: Video Segment from Nature  
      
    The Hawaiian Islands were created by volcanic eruptions. Continuous eruptions mean the islands are constantly changing. In an effort to safeguard the residents and communities on these islands, scientists conduct regular tests on lava flow samples to help predict future eruptions. This is a dangerous undertaking, even for the most experienced scientists.
  • National Park Service: Volcanism Interactive
    Volcanoes provide spectacular evidence that we are living on a dynamic planet, where land can be created or destroyed without regard to human structures or civilizations. This interactive resource adapted from the National Park Service provides an introduction to the wonderful diversity of volcanoes, describing how they form and explaining the great variation in their size and shape and in the processes that created them.
 

Volcano News--Happening Now

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NOAAWatch Volcanoes Headlines

 Volcano news from the federal government.

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Volcano Safety

Can Volcanologists Predict Eruptions?

  • Forecasting Volcanic Eruptions
  • Seismic Signals
    This interactive activity from NOVA Online illustrates some of the clues modern seismologists are using to better understand activity deep within a volcano, in hopes of improving their ability to predict eruptions.
  • Volcanoes in the Infrared
    In this video adapted from KUAC-TV and the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, learn how thermal imaging is used to help predict volcanic eruptions. See how satellite sensors can measure ground temperatures over large areas using infrared radiation. Observe how another device, a forward-looking infrared radiometer (FLIR), provides higher resolution images, and understand how monitoring volcanoes can reduce risks for air traffic and local residents.

Explore Alaska's Volcanoes

  • Explore Alaska's Volcanoes  
      
    In this interactive activity adapted from the University of Alaska, learn about four of Alaska's active volcanoes: Augustine, Cleveland, Okmok, and Veniaminof. Explore each volcano through photographs and investigate how different types of satellite images (synthetic aperture radar, thermal infrared, and color composite) are used to study volcanoes.

Stromboli

http://bit.ly/yqg9VM

  • Global Volcanism Program: Stromboli
  • Geology.com: Stromboli
    About the Author: Jessica Ball is a graduate student in the Department of Geology at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Her concentration is in volcanology, and she is currently researching lava dome collapses and pyroclastic flows. Jessica earned her Bachelor of Science degree from the College of William and Mary, and worked for a year at the American Geological Institute in the Education/Outreach Program.
  • Photovolcanica: Stromboli
    The owner of this site says Permission is granted under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License (GFDL), Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation, to use images from this site insofar as their resolution does not exceed 200x300 pixels. Images with a resolution above this level are explicitly excluded from GFDL usage. The intention is to allow Wikipedia authors to make use of the images, without opening the door to commercial abuse.
  • Stromboli Volcano - John Seach
  • Wikipedia: Stromboli

Mt. Vesuvius

Vesuvius from the air

http://bit.ly/zDNXXH

Paracutin, Mexico

http://bit.ly/xJDTyU

Mt. St. Helens

Mt. Pelee

http://bit.ly/xOJpIf

Mt. Ruapehu

http://bit.ly/AcEeYP

  • NASA Earth Observatory: Ruapehu
  • Ruapehu Volcano - John Seach
  • Global Volcanism Program: Ruapehu
  • Photovolcanica: Ruapehu
    The owner of this site says Permission is granted under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License (GFDL), Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation, to use images from this site insofar as their resolution does not exceed 200x300 pixels. Images with a resolution above this level are explicitly excluded from GFDL usage. The intention is to allow Wikipedia authors to make use of the images, without opening the door to commercial abuse.
  • NZ Resources
    This is a blog, and the author has provided the following note: This page will be updated frequently if the mountain becomes active. Until then, our reports have been archived offline.
  • Wikipedia: Ruapehu
 

Books in the MRC

Images

Take A Volcano Quiz

Mt. Pinatubo

http://bit.ly/y4hMvt

Magic Dogs of the Volcanoes: Read a Story Online

http://bit.ly/AF5iDV

  • Magic Dogs of the Volcanoes
    In this online book from the International Children's Digital Library, the magic dogs that protect Salvadorean villagers are pursued by wicked soldiers. But with the help of two ancient volcanoes, they triumph.
    Bilingual in English and Spanish. Author—Manlio Argueta. Illustrator—Elly Simmons.

Mt. Kilauea

http://bit.ly/AgzwH9

Santa Maria

File:Santiaguito from Santamaria.jpg

http://bit.ly/yb2G2v

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